Tuesday, May 02, 2006

Restoration


My parents' wedding, August 28, 1971.

My mom sent me this photo to fix up which I was happy to do--it was simple and only took about 15 minutes--just the crease at the top, a bit of discoloration and few splotches really.

More restoration: Mommy Restored & Kleiner Alex

Once we move back to The Land of Milk and Honey I plan to have my own photography business (portraiture) and I think photo restoration, in addition to stock photography, would be a nice addition. Why? Because unless you can time travel, photo memories are all you’ve got and they’re probably faded, yellowed, and on non-archival photo paper, which means they will continue to age. That's were I come in. Give me your photo, I'll scan it and spruce it up and even make prints on my fancy photo printer which uses archival quality inks and paper--these images should last 300 years, or so they say.

Word of warning: If you are printing your digital images and then dumping the files you are going to be sorry. The paper most prints are made on is good for about 7 years , after that you're going to get fading and discoloration. Be sure to save all of your images on a CD, whether you think you'll print them or not. Dad, remember this please. :)

4 comments:

JoJo said...

Very nice work again. The "whitening" of your mom's dress is good....

Affable said...

Digital restoration is wonderful stuff!

If you archive to CD, make sure you know the rated lifetime of the recordable CD. In the worst case it's only a few years, even shorter than the photograph's lifetime...

Christina said...

Affable,

Indeed you are correct and the CD makers are really marketing to people's fears on this. For instance you can buy archival gold CDs which apparently last 200 years. I bought a particular brand of these thinking I needed to jump on that bandwagon and the gold peeled off and I lost 3 discs with original RAW images on them, probably close to 300 images.

The trick to CDs lifetime is keeping them out of light. Some purists I know even keep them in the fridge.

I always back up onto 2 CDs using a different 'non-peeling' archival gold cd, I keep one disc at home and the other in a remote location, back up on my external drive, and lastly I upload jpeg versions of my RAW files to shutterfly as a last resort :)

Tiring stuff but worth it :)

Thanks for reading,

Christina

Stephanie said...

Parfait - I'd be into hiring you out for restoration...